The Booby

 Booby Fly Pattern

Originated by Gordon Fraser, a UK fly tier in the early 1980s The Booby fly pattern has rapidly gained popularity worldwide. It’s certainly a non-traditional pattern and has an amazing bobbing and weaving action in the water. The pattern presented here is an attractor type patterns but any number of natural patterns can be tied with the bulbous eyes that give this fly its name. For those who are wondering, yes, the name Booby originated from the slightly childish comparison to a well-endowed woman.

Components:

Hook: Mustad R-50-94480

Thread: 6/0 Hot Orange

Tail: Hot Orange Marabou

Body: Hot Orange Crystal Chenille

Eyes: Medium While Booby Eye Foam or other closed cell white foam

Wing case: Hot Orange Marabou with Gold SuperFlash or Flashabou

 

Fishing Methods:           

Fish the Booby with a full sink line with a short 3-4′ leader. Let the fly line settle on the bottom and the buoyant fly will suspend several inches above the bottom. You can either wait for a cruising trout to come near the fly or just start your retrieve as soon as the line settles. Either strip the fly in with short 4-6″ pulls or use a 8-12″ strip, pause, strip pause motion. As an alternative this can be fished with a clear intermediate or even floating line as a surface pattern either on its own or as the lead fly on a hopper / dropper set up.  You can also try this fly in a variety of colors whether a bright attractor color like orange or chartreuse or natural colors as a bait fish (white) or damselfly or dragon pattern. Avoid the temptation to tie this on a long hook due to the length of the pattern. The hook length should be 1/3 to 1/2 the overall length. I haven’t tried it yet but this fall I’m going to try some Booby-ized dragon patterns with natural colored eyes. Brown or black permanent felt pens work well and going with a smaller eye pattern should make for a “buggy” look while helping keep the fly up off the bottom a few inches. While this fly has been rarely known to catch fish on slow streams and rivers it is virtually exclusively a cast and retrieve stillwater fly pattern.

Comments:       

Avoid the temptation to tie this on a long hook due to the length of the pattern. The hook length should be 1/3 to 1/2 the overall length. I haven’t tried it yet but this fall I’m going to try some Booby-ized dragon patterns with natural colored eyes. Brown or black permanent felt pens work well and going with a smaller eye pattern should make for a “buggy” look while helping keep the fly up off the bottom a few inches.

 

Species Targeted: Trout, Bass, Carp

Creator:  Gordon Fraser

Submitted By:  Rob Woods

email

Rob Woods

Rob Woods is the older of the two brothers and is a little more novice of the two as a fly fisher. He’s been lucky enough in a few trips fly fishing to land rainbows over 9 lbs and pink salmon over 7 lbs and is continuing to learn to tie flies. Rob’s is also the father of 2 beautiful daughters who he is hoping catch the fishing bug. Outside of fishing Rob also enjoys, cooking and grilling, camping, and the outdoors. Rob is also an experienced internet marketer specializing in SEO in Vancouver. He’s the one responsible for most of this site so if anything is wrong, you can blame him.

4 Comments:

  1. Can’t wait to try the Booby this season with you and your bro at the lake.Like the site keep up the good work. !!

  2. “Avoid the temptation to tie this on a long hook ”

    Don’t think this is good advice – there are many Booby variants, some need longer hooks, especially those using fur strips.

    Shameless plug – see the full Booby story with Booby variants and how to tie them at http://www.bishfish.co.nz/webbooks/smttrout/boobyfly.htm

    • Hi Tony,

      Thanks for stopping by and commenting. I think the advice to tie on a short hook is related to how aggressively trout can hit this fly. With the longer hook it the fish tend to take the hook deeper and survival rates can drop if one is practicing catch and release. If a pattern needs a longer hook it obviously makes sense to use one. If you are fishing for keepers this is less of an issue obviously.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *